Footloose (2011) – Review

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I’ll be honest, I was biased when I pressed play.

I recorded it weeks ago, but with nothing else on TV, I decided to finally put it on.

Remakes in general drive me nuts, so I wasn’t too enthusiastic about this one – not to mention they removed the best part: Kevin Bacon!

From reading this review, you may think I’m some old fogey. No, I am almost 25 years old, and am honest enough to admit that I do not agree with the kids in this movie at all. Instead of my usual review format, I’ll just do bullet-points.

The Good

  • The acting. I didn’t know most of them (with the exception of Miles Teller, Dennis Quaid, and Andie MacDowell), but all of them played their roles well.
  • The dancing featured some of our favourite moves from the original, while incorporating modern actions.
  • They kept to the idea of the original, not trying to make it something different. After all, what makes movies like the original Footloose a great movie, is that it can be timeless.

The Bad

  • Rules make kids rebel – No, idiot kids do that just fine on their own. It’s like saying laws like ‘No Murder’ are responsible for people wanting to murder. Of course ‘no music’ is ridiculous, but indulging in underage sex, drugs, and alcohol aren’t intelligent decisions. Until we are ~25 years old, our brains are still forming, and the last part to form is the long-term effects of their actions. As adults it is our responsibility to ensure those still developing aren’t making the decisions they cannot make. If they think it’s unfair, tough luck.
  • Church and State – The world isn’t going to follow God and doesn’t believe in Him, but that doesn’t mean He’s not real. There is no real separation of church and state, God has laws and they are above all other laws. Most of the time, where do you think they got the laws?
  • Dancing in the Bible – Yes David and the worshippers danced, but no where in the Bible does it have them rubbing up against each other in a Holy way in celebration of God.
  • At every step of the movie they show how right the laws were. These kids didn’t want to do things the right way. When there was no law against music, they still acted like idiots. If they didn’t have alcohol and drugs, and didn’t let their dance movements lead to underage sex, then there wouldn’t be a problem.
  • Adults may play these roles in the movie, but the ages are 15/16/17 years old. They are children, not adults. They have barely been alive, and yet they think they know everything. News flash, they don’t.

I’m sure there are many more reasons I can name, but I’ll leave it there for now. Let me know what you thought of the movie.

To finish on a lighter note, here is the amazing Kevin Bacon doing his famous dance in 2014.

 

3 out of 5 stars

Roswell High: The Watcher – Book Review

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I don’t remember much about the show ‘Roswell‘. My older sister watched it a lot, and I know the faces, but that’s about it.

Looking through a box for my next book to read, I found ‘Roswell High: The Watcher‘. Number four in the series, it isn’t a long book, and it contains information from previous novels – not to mention essentially ending on a ‘to be continued’.

As I said, I don’t remember much of the show, but surely it was better than this. The writing was immature, the characters acted ridiculously, and the events moved way too quickly. I know it is a book about aliens –  so how realistic could it be? – but I still expected more.

If you still want to read this book and reminisce about an old TV favourite, go ahead, and let me know what you think.

2.5 out of 5

NRL Earflap Hat – Free Beanie Knitting Pattern

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With the last game of the 2016 State of Origin series about to grace our screens, what better way to celebrate your team than by knitting your own beanie?

If you have wool left over, check out the other free knitting patterns HERE (cushion cover), and HERE (scarf).

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NRL Scarf – Free Knitting Pattern

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So we’ve had State of Origin NRL Cushion Covers (HERE), and now we have State of Origin NRL Scarves.

These are free knitting patterns from Lincraft, so make sure you go in store (or shop online) to get the very best colours and wool.

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NRL Cushion Cover – Free Knitting Pattern

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YAY! I’m so happy! My local Lincraft store has released a lot of new knitting patterns.

To help spread the love for those not near a store, I will be uploading them here. Let me know what your favourite is.

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The Trap – Book Review

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There are books you read that are entertaining, and then there are books that are so captivating you cannot put them down. The Trap is definitely the latter. It took me only about a week to devour the 281 pages, and I already feel like I could read it again (not to mention watch it as a movie).

If you haven’t heard of it before, the blurb is this:

Twelve years ago, Linda Conrads’ sister Anna was brutally murdered. Her killer was never identified, but Linda glimpsed his face as he escaped.
Now, all these years later, she’s just seen him again, on TV.
He’s become a well-known journalist, and Linda – a famous novelist and notorious recluse – knows no one will believe her if she accuses him.
So she sets a trap for him, writing a thriller called Blood Sisters about the unsolved murder of a young woman.
And agrees to give just one interview.
At home.
To the only person who knows more about the case than she does…
But is he really the killer – or is she losing her mind?

Are you hooked yet? I was. Through the Text Publishing website, I found a list of new books they had coming out, and snapped it up when it was at my local store. This is the debut for author Melanie Raabe, and if this is any indication of what she can churn out, I can’t wait to read more of her stuff.

Without giving away any spoilers, I will say that this book is full of twists and turns, and just when you think you’ve figured it out, you’re thrown another curve ball.

I would recommend The Trap to anyone, and want to know what you think of it.

4 out of 5 stars

‘The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope’ – Book Review

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*CONTAINS SPOILERS*

If I cast my memory back, I believe it was during a local book store’s closing down sale that I first saw ‘The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope‘. The cover and title instantly caught my eye, and someone I knew it would be the mix between enthralling characters, great story, and weirdness – though maybe this is because I was instantly reminded of The Odd Life of Timothy Green (2012).

Once I read the synopsis on the back, I was hooked, and bought it. A myriad of factors got in the way, and it took probably over a year before I began page 1.

Rhonda Riley certainly has a talent for describing scenery and setting the scene. What first appears to be a normal story set in the Post-WW2 era, becomes a tale possibly from out of this world. After a violent rain storm, Evelyn discovers a person partly-buried in the field of the farm she has been left in-charge of. As she wipes the dirt away, it is clear this is not an ordinary person. There are no features, no hair, no clothes, and no gender markers.

Living all alone on the farm, Evelyn brings the stranger inside, and that is where their relationship takes off.

There are parts of the book that I found unnecessary; storylines that felt included for the sake of popularity with the current-ideals. Riley managed to make it work with the story and the evolution of the characters, but I did question whether to put the book down.

Boy am I glad I didn’t! I have just finished this book, and my eyes are still sore from crying. I’m not usually emotional over stories – and maybe I’m coming down with a cold or the flu – but the way Riley makes you feel for these characters and their loss is phenomenal. This family want answers just as badly as we do. They suffer with uncertainty. We all have fears about our own mortality, and for Evelyn and Adam (or A/Addie) this is definitely amplified.

I loved how the book covered such a large period of time, and I feel almost like Adam, remaining young as the characters I’ve grown attached to age and wither.

While I wouldn’t go searching this book for ideas on religion and answers about mortality, I would recommend it for someone who likes a good story.

3.5 out of 5 stars