Isaiah 25:6

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Every night I do my Bible reading, but there was a verse that had caused me some trouble. Obviously I know that every document – especially historical – must be read in context, so I set off on my task.

The Verse:

On this mountain the Lord Almighty will prepare
a feast of rich food for all peoples,
a banquet of aged wine
the best of meats and the finest of wines.
ISAIAH 25:6 (NIV)

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Photo found HERE.

The Problem:

In this verse, Isaiah is talking about the feast that will be had in Heaven. Regardless if it is an actual, physical, feast, or not, it is the use of the word ‘meats‘ that confused me.

Death is an enemy. Nothing died in the Garden of Eden, because death could not exist in the presence of our Holy Lord. This means that when we are together in Heaven, there will be no more death, and that includes animals.

So, how are we then eating meat?

Numerous times throughout the book of Isaiah’s prophecies, he talks about peace from death in Heaven, so why is this different. Isaiah was such a God-loved man, and Jesus often referred to him, so how could I reconcile this?

I was puzzled.

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Researching:

I emailed a friend and my brother, but didn’t get an answer that satisfied me.

I tried assorted Google searches, but no one seemed to be talking about it. Everyone spoke of Isaiah’sproclamation‘ of vegetarianism in Heaven, so I knew there must have been a clear answer to my query. I just had to keep looking.

There is a fantastic website called Bible Gateway, which has a multitude of translations of both the Old and New Testament. The default one seemed to be NIV (New International Version). It read as above.

My friend is a HUGE fan of the King James Version (KJV), so I thought I would see if that phrased it in a clearer way.

And in this mountain shall the Lord of hosts
make unto all people a feast of fat things,
a feast of wines on the lees,
of fat things full of marrow,
of wines on the lees well refined.
ISAIAH 25:6 (KJV)

Here we can see it is a bit different. Instead of ‘meat‘ it says ‘fat things full of marrow‘. Granted it’s not very different, but maybe it can give some clues.

As I said before, we must always read in context. One site I visited said that marrow is not only very good for you to eat, but is a delicacy. It is opulent and rich, and not something a lot of people can afford. At the time in which Isaiah was writing this prophecy, they were at war. What was something that was unattainable and would be seen as a great luxury in Heaven? Meat and wine.

While you may be able to read through Isaiah like one chapter after the other, it is important to note that the book is a collection of his prophecies, and each occurred at a different time. What he may have said in one context in one prophecy, would be totally different in another.

I had one last look at the list of Bible translations, and found exactly what I was looking for.

On this mountain AdonaiTzva’ot
will make for all peoples
a feast of rich food and superb wines,
delicious, rich food and superb, elegant wines.
ISAIAH 25:6 (CJB)

This translation comes from the CJB Complete Jewish Bible – and, I think, would be closest, as it is for the Old Testament.

Here we can see that what was translated as ‘meat‘, was previously translated as ‘delicious, rich food‘.

The Solution:

Isaiah was saying that, in Heaven, there will be no more death and fear (like they were experiencing with their ongoing war), and they would be free to eat the best food and drink the best drink.

The use of meat was not literal, and was the context of the time of what they considered a “delicious, rich food“. They would have known it would not have been actual meat, because Isaiah (and others) had said no more death would occur in Heaven.

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Photo found HERE. It is actually titled ‘Wedding at Cana’ by Paolo Veronese. Though not the feast in Heaven, Jesus always likened it to a wedding feast, and it was at this wedding that Jesus miraculously transformed water into wine.

So, I hope you liked this little research trip. I wanted to write it in case someone else stumbled upon the words.

If you have anything else to add, please do so in the comments below!

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5 Facts About Christianity

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*Not suitable for children*

It seems like everyday I come across another misunderstanding on the internet about our Dear Lord Jesus. I thought I would address some of these today.

If you have any questions, ask in the comments below.

1. Jesus wasn’t a tall, white man with long hair.

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The New Testament gives no description of Jesus. We can only figure out what Jesus would have looked like by looking at the time and place in which he lived.

Isaiah 53:2b says: “he [Jesus] had no form or majesty that we should look at him, and no beauty that we should desire him.”

Common Jewish traditions meant men had beards – and were humiliated to have a shaven face.

His hair would not have been that long. Not only does Paul says many did not like it that way, but, as a carpenter, it would have gotten in the way.

He probably had a lot of muscles, as working with the wood and stones would have been very laborious.

His family were not rich, so his robe would have looked like all others.

As we read in numerous verses, Jesus looked much like all other Jewish males of the time, and we need to remember that looks have nothing to do with the power and majesty that is our Lord Jesus Christ.

Is this so bad? Personally, while I think it’s important to know the truth and understand his appearance doesn’t mean anything, we can also view it as

2. Magi, Wise Men, or Kings?

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Almost every Christmas carol mentions either three Magi, three Wise Men, or Three Kings. But who were they?

We don’t know how many there were. It is commonly thought to be three because they gave gold, frankincense, and myrrh, but it could have been two, or numerous.

They were not Kings. They would have been scholars who were fluent in the Old Testament and knew the signs to look for. They came from the East (the orient), which was possibly Persia or Babylon, etc.

3. The Wise Men were not at Jesus’ birth.

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In Matthew 2:1-12 we read that the Wise Men came looking for Jesus after he was born. They approached King Herod, who then proceeded to call together all of his “chief priests and teachers of the law”. From here, the Wise Men went all the way to where Jesus was. This could have been back in Nazareth since time had passed, although it was probably in Bethlehem because when Herod had the babies killed, it was the cry out of Ramah.

Herod’s order decreed the death of the children under two years old, so time must have passed.

4. They counted the days differently.

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If Jesus was crucified on Friday, and rose again on Sunday, how could he have been dead for three days? The answer lies in how the days were counted back then.

We can read more in-depth about it HERE, but there are two ways to calculate Jesus’ death and resurrection as three days.

1.

DAY 1 DAY2 DAY 3
THU
starts at
sundown on Wed.
THU
ends at sundown
FRI
starts at sundown on Thu . . .
FRI
ends at
sundown
SAT
starts at sundown on Fri.
SAT
ends at sundown
SUN
starts at sundown on Sat.
SUN
ends at sundown
Night Day Night Day Night Day Night Day
Crucifixion Sabbath He rose

“The solution is simple when we learn that according to Jewish custom any part of a day, however small, is included as part of a full day. “Since the Jews reckoned part of a day as a full day, the ‘three days and three nights’ could permit a Friday crucifixion.””

2. 

“The verses above tell us that the Passover occurred on the 14th day of the first month of the Jewish Calendar year. This corresponds to our months of March-April. It is possible, then, that this Passover could have occurred during the week with the Saturday Sabbath following. Since Lev. 23:5-7 tells the people to rest on the first day (not the last day Saturday), this is a type of Sabbath occurrence. Therefore, perhaps the following chart could represent a Thursday crucifixion and a subsequent set of three “night and days” before the Sunday resurrection.”

Day 1 Day 2 Day 3
13th of Nisan 14th of Nisan 15th of Nisan 16th of Nisan
THU
starts at
sundown on Wed.
THU
ends at sundown
FRI
starts at sundown on Thu . . .
FRI
ends at
sundown
SAT
starts at sundown on Fri.
SAT
ends at sundown
SUN
starts at sundown on Sat.
SUN
ends at sundown
Night Day Night Day Night Day Night Day
Passover/Crucifixion Sabbath He rose

“Something worth mentioning concerning this is that in the Greek in Matthew. 28:1, it says “Now after the Sabbaths [PLURAL], as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary came to look at the grave.” It is possible that there may have been two “sabbaths” during that week. The first may have been the Passover related “Sabbath” and the second may have been the Saturday Sabbath.”

5. Jesus had brothers and sisters.

You’ve probably heard about Jesus, human-father Joseph, and the Virgin Mary. But did you know Jesus had brothers and sisters born after him? In numerous places in the New Testament, we read about Jesus’ siblings. These would have been his half-siblings, as Joseph was not his father (God was).

There is a great website, HERE, that explains it perfectly. Excerpts include:

“Jesus’ brothers are mentioned in several Bible
verses. Matthew 12:46Luke 8:19, and Mark 3:31 say
that Jesus’ mother and brothers came to see Him. The
Bible tells us that Jesus had four brothers: James,
Joseph, Simon, and Judas (Matthew 13:55). The Bible also
tells us that Jesus had sisters, but they are not named
or numbered (Matthew 13:56).”

So, hopefully you’ve learned a bit about Christianity. I will be adding more Facts About Christianity, so make sure to subscribe and check back.

Silent Night – A Christmas Carol Study

This is the third blog post in a series dissecting Christmas Carols. I’ve been going through the lyrics, and explaining how they are wonderful testaments to the glory and love that is the birth of Jesus, Son of God.

You can check out O Little Town Of Bethlehem (HERE), and Away in a Manger (HERE).

This post is about the classic carol Silent Night.

Silent night, Holy night

There are a lot of Christmas carols that refer to the night of the birth of Jesus as ‘silent’ and ‘still’.

While I do not think there are any records of a specific lull, and Bethlehem being inundated with many families coming to register for the census ordered by Caesar Augustus, I think it is referring to the lack of royal heraldry that should surround the birth of a king.

Jesus, the saviour and promised king, was not born in a palace surrounded by servants; he was born in a stable (although exact locations are still debated) and laid in a manger with animals and a handful of admirers around him. Despite all of the ‘clues’ throughout the Old Testament that pointed right to Jesus, barely anyone recognised the signs. It was both silent, and Holy.

Round yon virgin, mother and child

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This line might be mistaken as saying “young”, commenting on Mary’s age. However, it is important to know that there are no indications that Mary was especially young. Instead, it refers to the prophecies and actualities of the event. In the Old Testament, we hear of Isaiah, a prophet who spoke God’s word during the time when Israel and Judah were separated. He foretold events that were close to happening, as well as those which would come long after he died. One of these things was the virgin birth of Jesus.

Isaiah 7:14 reads: “Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.”

A virgin becoming pregnant and having a child was not a common thing. It was a miracle, meaning it wasn’t happening all the time. But there is one ‘person’ who could make it happen, and that was the Creator God who made and implemented these laws of nature in the first place. But you might ask, why did God choose a virgin birth? There are two reasons for this.

Firstly, as I wrote above, a virgin giving birth was not something that happened. No one had heard of it before, and it was a clear sign that this event was the one God had spoken about since the first sin.

Secondly, even though all humans are sinful, and Mary was not immune to this, Jesus was not considered a sinner before birth, because Joseph was not technically his father. In ancient Hebrew culture, it was the head of the house – the man – that influenced the sinfulness of the whole family. When we talk about Adam and Eve, even though Eve was the first to break God’s rules, Adam was, in essence, responsible for her and her actions. The male line carries the sin, and with Jesus’ male line coming from God, he was sinless even before birth.

Holy infant, tender and mild
Sleep in heavenly peace,
Sleep in heavenly peace.

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At every stage, Jesus bucked the human-ideal of a King. Being referred to as ‘tender’ and ‘mild’ would not have been a compliment for them. However, Jesus never changed his mild demeanour. He taught against violence and hate, and performed wondrous miracles without demanding attention.

As the Son of God, the creator of Heaven, Jesus lived there before coming down to Earth, and this repeated line seems to point to his knowledge of his Godliness even as a young babe.

Silent night, Holy night
Son of God, love’s pure light

When you think of Jesus, you immediately think of love. No one, not even the Pharisees desperate to demean his name and Godly-personage, could truthfully state a sin he committed.

Jesus also called himself ‘the Light’. John 8:12 records: “When Jesus spoke again to the people, he said, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” This is a beautiful representation of God’s love and power, as light is not only comforting – as in a night-light to little children – but light drives out the darkness, darkness cannot drive out the light.

Radiant beams from thy holy face

How many of you have seen images like the ones above? Have you ever thought about why Jesus – and Saints in Catholicism – have their head surrounded by a circle of light?

This ring of light is called a halo and features in all sorts of art. When we see them in relation to Jesus, it is a way of attempting to capture the light that shone from his face. No, Jesus did not actually have a glowing head, it is a symbol of his pureness and the love that emanated from him. One definition of ‘radiance’ is: great joy or love, apparent in someone’s expression or bearing. (As a side-note, an example I found for this definition is about a bride’s radiant smile, which is an interesting connection, because Jesus is often referred to as being ‘married’ to the church).

A few Bible verses use this imagery.

The Lord make his face shine on you,
And be gracious to you;
Numbers 6:25

So when Aaron and all the sons of Israel
saw Moses, behold, the skin of his face
shone, and they were afraid to come near him.
Exodus 34:30

Who is like the wise man and who knows
the interpretation of a matter? A man’s
wisdom illumines him and causes his stern
face to beam.
Ecclesiastes 8:1

There are many, many more examples, which you can find HERE.

With the dawn of redeeming grace,

Jesus was only just born, and already he was being praised for his Godliness and Holiness. Not only was this because the people knew who he was, but because it was the beginning of all they had been promised. They knew what he had come to do, and for that promise to have come true, it meant all the other promises would as well.

The Israelites hadn’t always had a smooth existence. We all know about the Israelites being held as slaves in Egypt and God’s miraculous rescue. However, it was far from being the only example. With every human tracing back to Adam and Eve, it is natural the story goes all the way back to them. God spoke to Satan, and Genesis 3:15 reads: “And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers; he will crush your head, and you will strike his heel.” This ‘he’ is Jesus, who Satan knew would one day destroy him. So at every chance he got, Satan has tried to turn people from God, and mess-up God’s plan to have Jesus be born. All too many times Israel turned from God and got their deserved punishment, and at the time of Jesus’ birth, they were under Roman rule. So with Jesus the fulfilment of the birth, they knew they were on the ‘dawn’ of their redemption from Satan and sin.

Jesus, Lord at thy birth
Jesus, Lord at thy birth.

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It is in the New Testament that we learn the most about Jesus. Throughout the Old Testament, we are told what to expect and look for, but it is through the Gospels that we fully learn about our Lord, Jesus. Most of the accounts tell of Jesus’ ministry, with a few telling of his birth, and very little about his childhood.

So does that mean Jesus was not God when he was younger? Did he not know? I, personally, believe Jesus knew he was God from birth, and that is what this repeated line means to me. They were not back-projecting praise when he became God later-on in life, they were saying that he was God since birth.

Silent night, Holy night
Shepherds quake, at the sight

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Despite a lot of Christmas carols saying three Kings came to visit Jesus, there are no actual account of this. Instead, it was shepherds, and then Wise Men (there are no times when it says three, people just assume that because they brought three gifts).

The shepherds were watching their flocks one night (also noteworthy is that Jesus most likely wasn’t born on December 25 because the weather wouldn’t have permitted shepherds and their flocks at that time). Suddenly, Angels of Heaven appeared to them. These beings are not the angels seen above, and were strange looking creatures.

I found a good description on a website called What Christians Want To Know:

Angels are not composed of physical matter but are spirit
beings created by God (Heb. 1:14).  They can resemble human
form when God permits or wills it (Gen. 19).  There are different
orders or ranks of angels in heaven.  Those that covered the
throne in heaven were mighty seraphim angels.  They had six
wings that hovered over the throne of God.   Two of the
seraphim’s wings covered their faces because God is so holy that
even the seraphim angels could not look upon God (Isaiah 6:2).
Another set of wings covered their feet for they were in the midst
of holy ground where God abided and Moses (Exodus 3:5) and Joshua (Joshua 5:15) had to remove their shoes while in the presence of
God.  Angels do have some human features like feet, voices,
and faces (Isaiah 6:1-2).

If you witnessed something like this, you would “quake at the sight” too. Even if they were in human-like form, there was still something about them that wasn’t usual.

Glories stream from heaven above
Heavenly, hosts sing Hallelujah.

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We read in the above section that the shepherds were terrified of this strange sight. Imagine their amazement when the angels began singing! ‘Hallelujah’ means ‘Praise the Lord’.

I recently got a children’s picture Bible (reviewed HERE), and I think it explains this part so all people can understand:

Then, all at once, the whole sky was full
of angels. They were singing together,
praising and thanking God for his gift to
the world. “Glory to God in heaven,” they
sang, “and peace on earth to those who
love him.”

What a spectacular sight and something to write about!

Christ the Savior is born,
Christ the Savior is born.

What is a ‘Saviour’? The dictionary defines it as: “a person who saves someone something from danger or difficulty.” Sounds interesting, but still kind of bland. Jesus is the Saviour, but he is definitely not bland.

There’s a lot to this, so I’ll summaries it in points and can explain further upon request.

  1. We were made to be sinless and live with God. God is holy and perfect, so can’t be around sin and let it continue.
  2. When Adam and Eve sinned, they were telling God that they wanted him to take a step back, so he did.
  3. With God’s eternal life for us now gone (remember, God can’t let sin continue and thrive), we were going to die. God didn’t want that to be the end.
  4. God taught Adam and Eve (who taught the continuing generations, etc.) how to conduct sacrifices. This death of animals wasn’t pleasant, and each time, they would have to see what their sin was doing (there was no death or suffering before the first sin). This death was to take the place for their death, making them once again right with God. But these were only animals, and it wasn’t enough to cover ALL of their future sins.
  5. There was only one sacrifice that could cover the sin, and that was a pure and sinless being. Not only this, but this being needed to defeat death. Death is an enemy to be feared, and needed to be overcome. Jesus was this being.

Jesus was – and is – definitely our saviour. He saved us from the danger of sin and eternal death.

Will you be thinking about these reasons the next time you sing Silent Night?

What is it about this song that you love the most? Let me know in the comments below, or write your own blog post and link me!