Why I Am A Christian

I’ve been talking to a lot of people because of this blog. Some are Christian, some are from other faiths, and some are atheists.

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The majority of the time, the atheists are militant, aiming to only proclaim their own faith (in themselves – a foolish option). I tried to answer their questions and spread God’s word, but I was left wanting. I felt broken inside. Over and over again I would answer questions, until I realised that these people didn’t want answers. They only wanted to fight. They never listened, and I felt like I was letting God down.

Then God put a  single verse in my head.

For everyone who asks receives, the
one who seeks finds; and to the one
who knocks, the door will be opened.
MATTHEW 7:8

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These people weren’t atheists because I hadn’t answered them. They were atheists because they WANTED to be. If they would truly seek God, He would reveal Himself to them.

During this time, I asked myself: Why am I a Christian?

CHILDHOOD
My mother raised me to believe in God. I don’t remember a time when I didn’t know He was up there. But with early childhood not being an easy time for my family, I could have blamed God. I didn’t. I understood.

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RESEARCH
It was when I entered university that I decided I needed to learn more about God. I wanted to know the TRUE history of the world; I wanted to know why I was created; and I wanted to know how I would be spending eternity. All those answers are found in the Bible. As the years have gone on, I have done research, research, and more research. Everything continues to point to God.

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So, why am I a Christian? I’m a Christian because I have listened to what God has told us about Himself, I have prayed that I would be filled with the Holy Spirit, and I have faith that Jesus died and rose from the dead to pay for our sins and defeat death.

Why are you a Christian? What is it about our Lord and Saviour that first called to you? Let me know in the comments below!

Writing How-To: Plot and Structure Plan – SIMPLE version

Over the last fifteen or so years, I have dedicated myself to researching new writing (short story, novel, script) tips, tricks, and techniques. So, naturally, I want to share them with you all.

Some of these tips will be from my own experience, some from research, and some from my university studies.

Let me begin by saying these structure plans are not a ‘must do’. Yes, they are how the vast majority of novels and screenplays are written, but writing is a creative form and can always be beautiful when done uniquely. This is the simple version (in-depth version still to come). For examples throughout, I will be using Speed (1994) – this means there will be SPOILERS!

1. Believable/Sympathetic lead character

Each story needs to begin with the introduction of the lead character and the world of the story. The majority of lead characters need to garner sympathy from the audience. If we feel bad for them when they are being targeted by the bad guys, we will root for them. (i.e. Jack Traven and Harry Temple are L.A. SWAT officers. Straight away we see them in action, and acknowledge them as the good guys. When Jack shoots Harry to get to bomber-Howard, there is humour, a likeable emotion. We like them, therefore we root for them.)

2. Urgent/Difficult problem

This is where the action really takes off. Our lead character must be affected by an urgent and difficult problem. Not every problem the lead character will face is evident at this point, but it sets up the antagonist. (i.e. Bomber-Howard contacts Jack, and sets up the premise: “There’s a bomb on a bus. Once the bus goes 50 miles an hour, the bomb is armed. If it drops below 50, it blows up.”)

3. Attempts to overcome the problem

This is where the majority of the story/novel/screenplay takes place. Imagine a cliff with jagged rises. Each plateau is another problem. There are no real limits to how many problems your story needs, but each one needs to keep progressing the story. (i.e. Speed (1994) contained many problems for Jack to overcome. They include – not in order because I can’t remember – getting onto the bus that has already reached the bomb activation limit, passenger with gun and subsequent shot driver, navigating in heavy traffic without slowing, getting passengers off, etc.)

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4. Climax/Last stand

This can either be a continuation of the action – one thing leading to the next and never letting up or giving the lead character time to breath and recover, or almost like an after-thought – such as in Speed (1994) where Jack and Annie think the event is over only to have to face one last, major, problem. This problem needs to be more threatening than the others. The lead character doesn’t even need to be entirely successful (though it is the norm), but it is the end of the conflict.

5. Resolution

The end of the story needs to almost mirror the introduction. It will show how the world of the story has changed, and how our lead character has grown from the experience.

So, this is the simple version of the Plot and Structure Plan. I will be going through the in-depth version soon, but this version is still great for beginners.